Watch: Wisconsin health department tracking COVID-19 cases by vaccination status

MADISON (WKBT) — The Wisconsin Department of Health Services has launched a new tool to track COVID-19 cases by vaccination status.

The webpage at dhs.wisconsin.gov includes tools that show the rate of COVID cases, hospitalizations, and deaths per 100,000 people among those who are fully vaccinated versus those who are not. The data is presented by month beginning in February 2021.

The idea is to clearly show the rates side-by-side to allow users to see the difference in case rates between the two groups.

Wisconsin Dhs Breakthrough Cases

Courtesy of Wisconsin Department of Health Services

“The increase in cases we are seeing in Wisconsin right now is being largely driven by the Delta variant, and the overwhelming majority of people who are contracting COVID have not been fully vaccinated,” said DHS Secretary-designee Karen Timberlake.

Timberlake broke down the infection rate of the Delta variant compared to the original strain of COVID.

“With the original strain of COVID-19, an infected person was likely to infect two other people, who were then likely to infect two additional people for a total of 6 cases from one infection. With the Delta variant, an infected person is likely to infect about five people, who are then likely to infect 25 people for a total of 30 cases from one infection,” said Timberlake. “The COVID-19 vaccines are still doing their job by stopping the spread of many new infections, and by preventing severe illness, hospitalization, and death.”

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services will answer questions and discuss the updated data at noon Thursday. We will have the media briefing streamed live right here and on the News 8 Now Facebook page.

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