Viroqua restaurant hosts ‘pay-what-you-can’ dinner

The holiday season can often be the hardest time of the year for families in need. But one area restaurant is making sure no one in our community feels left out.

Owners of Driftless Cafe in Viroqua are hosting a ‘pay-what-you-can’ dinner Wednesday. The dinner falls on the darkest day of the year, but owners Luke and Ruthie Zahm are lighting up the city with their act of kindness.

It’s indicative of the sense of closeness in the community that’s hard to miss.

Their generosity comes with one simple goal:

“To put aside our differences, and be able to grow in our own communities,” said Luke Zahm.

After finding out about the dinner, it didn’t take long for people in Viroqua to respond.

“People who have wanted to either donate their time by coming in and washing dishes, or handing out cocoa outside for people waiting to get a table, or products, we’ve had farmers contact us making sure we have food for that evening, it’s really been overwhelming,” said Luke Zahm.

One of those community members is “Cowboy Joe,” who’s known for his Viroqua bakery shop, Cowboy David’s Cookies and Cakes. He says helping out is a no-brainer, so he’s donating two cakes for the dinner. It’s a way to turn something sweet, even sweeter.

“It’s empowering, it’s humbling, and honestly it’s like a Tuesday, and what I mean by that is this is who we’re supposed to be as people, helping other people,” Cowboy Joe said.

Sitting down to share the same meal, despite any differences, it’s a way of bringing light to areas of darkness and proving that sometimes the smallest towns, carry the biggest hearts.

“Knowing that we’ve been supported by this community, that we’ve been successful in this community, being able to give back in that way feels good for both of us,” said Ruthie Zahm.

A portion of the proceeds from the dinner will benefit local families in need.

About 80 percent of the food revenue comes from local farmers in Vernon and Crawford county.

Driftless Cafe owners say part of the reason why they’re hosting this dinner is to bring people together after a divided election.

They say they hope they can host a ‘pay-what-you-can’ dinner at least once a year.

The dinner service begins at 5 p.m. Wednesday and diners can order off the regular menu.

No tickets are necessary.

The holiday season can often be the hardest time of the year for families in need. But one area restaurant is making sure no one in our community feels left out.

Owners of Driftless Cafe in Viroqua are hosting a ‘pay-what-you-can’ dinner Wednesday. The dinner falls on the darkest day of the year, but owners Luke and Ruthie Zahm are lighting up the city with their act of kindness.

It’s indicative of the sense of closeness in the community that’s hard to miss.

Their generosity comes with one simple goal:

“To put aside our differences, and be able to grow in our own communities,” said Luke Zahm.

After finding out about the dinner, it didn’t take long for people in Viroqua to respond.

“People who have wanted to either donate their time by coming in and washing dishes, or handing out cocoa outside for people waiting to get a table, or products, we’ve had farmers contact us making sure we have food for that evening, it’s really been overwhelming,” said Luke Zahm.

One of those community members is “Cowboy Joe,” who’s known for his Viroqua bakery shop, Cowboy David’s Cookies and Cakes. He says helping out is a no-brainer, so he’s donating two cakes for the dinner. It’s a way to turn something sweet, even sweeter.

“It’s empowering, it’s humbling, and honestly it’s like a Tuesday, and what I mean by that is this is who we’re supposed to be as people, helping other people,” Cowboy Joe said.

Sitting down to share the same meal, despite any differences, it’s a way of bringing light to areas of darkness and proving that sometimes the smallest towns, carry the biggest hearts.

“Knowing that we’ve been supported by this community, that we’ve been successful in this community, being able to give back in that way feels good for both of us,” said Ruthie Zahm.

A portion of the proceeds from the dinner will benefit local families in need.

About 80 percent of the food revenue comes from local farmers in Vernon and Crawford county.

Driftless Cafe owners say part of the reason why they’re hosting this dinner is to bring people together after a divided election.

They say they hope they can host a ‘pay-what-you-can’ dinner at least once a year.

The dinner service begins at 5 p.m. Wednesday and diners can order off the regular menu.

No tickets are necessary.