MADISON, Wis. -- In the political chess match over the recall efforts. the latest Republican move hit a roadblock on Monday.

State Senator Dale Schultz (R- Richland Center) announced he will not support his party's plan to put their new legislative boundaries into effect immediately.

"I'm not interested in voting to give myself an advantage in a potential upcoming recall by either side against myself. I think the people who voted me into office ought to have that right," said Schultz.

As the majority party, the Republicans are in control of drawing the new boundaries. Some see the effort to implement them now as nothing more than trying to give the party an advantage should some of its members be recalled in the coming months.

"I think they are clearly nervous about their 1 vote majority," said State Sen. Jennifer Shilling (D- La Crosse)

Shilling, who won office through a recall election earlier this year, thinks the Republican-backed plan is unfair. She thinks the people who elected a lawmaker should be the ones who decide whether or not they should be recalled.

"Whether it was a year ago or if it was three years ago, those should be the people who should be recalling their sitting state senator. It should not be new constituents," said Shilling.

At a hearing in Madison on Monday, the author of the bill argued using the new boundaries makes best sense. State Senator Mary Lazich (R- New Berlin) says it puts the decision in the hands of future constituents and not past ones.

"The fairness issue is that the people you will represent should make that election decision and they shouldn't be denied a vote," said Lazich.

State Sen. Schultz has voted against his party before, including on the collective bargaining issue. Republicans only have a 1 seat majority in the state senate, so the bill can not pass without his vote.

Under the current law, the new legislative boundaries don't take effect until the 2012 fall elections.