ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) -- Minnesota's campaign spending regulators may still pursue greater public disclosure of spending to influence campaigns for statewide ballot measures.

The state's Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board had the chance Tuesday to settle lingering disclosure questions with wide ramifications for next year's statewide vote on whether to ban gay marriage in the state Constitution. But board members defeated a motion to stop researching a higher level of ballot spending disclosure.

The board has been tinkering with ballot measure disclosure requirements as the gay marriage campaign approaches. Groups in favor of the marriage ban complain the new disclosure guidelines are intrusive and could discourage some donors.

The leader of Common Cause Minnesota says if the board doesn't tighten guidelines it could lead to lots of undisclosed spending on ballot campaigns.