Many people in our communities will soon be braving the dark and cold of the early mornings for the hunting seasons, but doctors want to ensure hunters don't stress themselves too much.

Like any sport, hunting can put a lot of strain on your body, especially your heart, and health officials in La Crosse see emergency room visits each season for heart attacks. The strain of hiking large hills or dragging a deer through the snow can stress the heart more than someone is used to.

Officials say your location also affects how others can help you if you are hurt.

"A lot of these people, something happens and you're out in the middle of a coulee somewhere, how are you going to get out is the number one thing. And how is anybody going to get to you to help you if you can't get yourself out of there, or if your hunting party can't get you out,” said Mayo Clinic Health System Emergency Room Physician Eric Grube.

These are some warning signs of heart attacks you can watch for while hunting: an uncomfortable pressure or pain in the center of the chest for more than two minutes, chest pain that spreads to the shoulders, neck or arms, and dizziness, fainting, nausea and shortness of breath.