There's a revolution in TV display technology, with new types like O-LED and Ultra-HD. Consumer Reports has advice if you, like lots of people, are having trouble sorting it all out.
That's today's On Your Side.
Ultra-HD is a higher-resolution LCD set. That means you can get huge screens, like the 84-inch model Consumer Reports' testers checked out. You also get a beautiful picture with lots of detail. But Ultra-HD sets start at $4,000 for a decent one, and there's another drawback. The problem with Ultra-HD is that it needs a lot of ultra-high-definition content. So you have a TV with a high resolution and not a lot of content to feed it.

OLED is another impressive new technology. The black levels on the OLED set Consumer Reports tested are the best testers have ever seen, it's good for watching movies with lots of dark scenes. The brightness levels are also great, giving the picture lots of contrast. But prices are still high. OLED sets start at about $9,000.

Consumer Reports says just like with most TV technologies, over the course of four or five years it will become a more mainstream product. Meanwhile, plasma TVs continue to improve. When Consumer Reports' testers looked at the OLED TVs, one thing that was really striking is how good some of the plasmas looked compared with that OLED, at much lower prices.

For example, Consumer Reports recommends the 55-inch Panasonic Viera TC-P55ST60. You'll get excellent picture quality for about $1,400. If your TV is in a room that gets a lot of light, an LCD television might be the best choice. Consumer Reports recommends the 55-inch LG 55GA7900. You'll get an excellent picture, very good sound, and a wide viewing angle for $1,500.
If your TV is in a room that gets a lot of light, an L-C-D television might be the best choice.
Consumer Reports recommends the 55-inch LG 55GA7900.
You'll get an excellent picture, very good sound, and a wide viewing angle for 15-hundred dollars.
I'm Martha Koloski and that's today's On Your Side.

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