"Of course we would go to Sprungli, a Zurich institution, but it was fun to go to the small local shops where the owners had become friends, where we would chat and taste lots, too."

While answering questions about Swiss confectionery on her blog, she realized that many of her friends who were either from Zurich or living there for years, didn't know about her favorite chocolate shops.

That's when she decided to do something about it.

Our sugary tour concludes in Conditorei Schober-Peclard, a legendary coffee house that's been successfully transformed into a pastry heaven.

Owned by gastronome Michel Peclard, it's housed in an impressive 14th-century building with a lavish interior and photogenic ornamental cash register.

The star here is the hot chocolate, which we taste in its cold edition, but there's an abundance of homemade pastries, cakes, ice creams and savory items.

While we're recounting our favorite tastings from the evening, the manager invites us to taste his latest discovery, a surprisingly refreshing cold brew of coffee mixed with tonic water.

Another great taste from the dark side.

Tasting instructions

We ask Rousset to share her expertise on the art of proper chocolate tasting.

"Use all your senses to recognize and appreciate a good quality chocolate bar; look for a nice sheen, not too glossy nor dull," she says.

"Sound: Break off a piece and you should hear a distinct snap, letting you know it was well-tempered.

"Smell: There are countless aromas in cocoa beans, so you'll smell a variety of natural aromas from fruits to spices to nuts, depending on the origin of the bean.

"Taste: Let it melt in your mouth -- don't chew -- and you should taste several flavors and no bitterness.

"A sign of a good quality chocolate is when there are several stages of flavor -- they develop in your mouth as it melts. More importantly, the flavor doesn't just disappear after you swallow, but lingers."

Sweet Zurich Tour; tours run Tuesday to Friday at 2 p.m. and last about two and a half hours (tour groups are typically two to eight people); CHF85 ($93)