ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) -

More Minnesota workers are considering financial incentives to participate in wellness programs that monitor their health. But those programs come at the sacrifice of some privacy.

It's not uncommon to offer basic incentives, such as a discount for gym membership. But some organizations are taking further steps, asking for information that leaves some participants a little uncomfortable.

Amy Smith works for the University of Minnesota Press. She's one of more than 5,700 university employees who'll receive at least a $300 discount on health insurance premiums next year for participating in activities including a questionnaire and a cholesterol screening. She tells Minnesota Public Radio if she weren't already enthusiastic about her health the requirements could feel "creepy."

A university spokesman says the program helps employees and also keeps costs down.