ONALASKA, Wis. -

Relief may be out there for one of the most common food allergies in the U.S.

Allergy Associates of La Crosse joined Duke University in a nationwide study looking at the effectiveness of drops to help peanut allergies. It's the first study to use drops instead of shots.

Right now, it's in a trial to prove its effectiveness even though Allergy Associates has been using the drops for more than four decades.

The president of Allergy Associates says it creates a safety margin which can be especially helpful for children. "They no longer have to worry if a food was manufactured in a facility with peanut or if there is trace amounts of peanut, or a small amount of peanut oil or a child next to their child touches them with peanut butter on their hands," said Dr. Mary Morris from Allergy Associates.

The drops do cause some minor side effects and one study participant needed to use an EpiPen.

Morris hopes the research will cut the hundreds of deaths from allergic reactions suffered every year.